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Glendale Days 2008

    Every year around the 4th of July, the entire community gets patriotic, and a sense of community spirit (latent for much of the year) blooms once again.  I've written before about the Glendale Parade and the joy that the community (adults and children) seem to take in our annual march through the park, and I'm glad to do so again today. 

    Of course, the other part of our 4th of July festivities has been Glendale Days.  Over time, this Glendale tradition has grown in size and in importance, drawing people from beyond Glendale's borders.  I think that's because there's nothing quite like it in the North Shore.  And all of that credit has to be given to the Glendale Days Committee, this year led by Alderperson JoAnn Shaw.  I should point out that when I came up to Ms. Shaw this weekend to commend her on an excellent festival, she would not accept credit.  Instead, she noted that Glendale Days 2008 was and is a group effort, and that the committee as a whole deserves the credit for a fabulous affair. 

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Those silly things that politicians say when they forget the microphone is on...

  You know, when it's an election season, there must be something in the air, because stupid comments are in full bloom this time of year.  I thought, with a few months to go before November, that I'd chronicle a few of my favorites right here.  Just keep in mind that I"m picking the really really ridiculous ones.  Politicians and their views are always being spouted, so I"m trying to get those extra special ones on print.  Let me know your thoughts, ok?

  1)  Phil Gramm. Now, what I find amusing is that as I was pondering commenting on Jesse Jackson's most recent slip (and he's had many, including a particular comment about New York that many are still sore at), and while I still will address Jackson's most recent stupid-ism, Phil Gramm's latest is what motivated this week's blog.  Apparently, according to Gramm, we are in a "mental recession" in this country, and, shortly after our national birthday, he perceived us as a nation not of _____, but rather, a "nation of whiners".  Blaming the media for "overstating" the current bad economy, he noted "Thank God the economy is not as bad as you read in the newspaper every day."  We are, according to him, in a "mental recession".  Well, if you ask me, he's the one who's got a mental recession. 

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The Real Carbon Footprint of a Cheeseburger.

 

  For those of you who read my blog frequently (and I know at least two of you guys are out there), you would probably agree that I know a thing or two about cheese.  For those of you who either know me personally or have followed my posts and publications from time to time, I think you'd also garner that I consider myself a reasoned progressive.  About 9 months ago, I posted an essay connecting lead paint in toys to environmentalism.  I've also written that the green choice for beer lovers should be homegrown microbrews. Organic hops are healthy hops. 

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¡Saludo al Jefe! (Hail to the Chief!)

  John McCain:  The First Hispanic President!  Or, more specifically, would he be the first Panamanian President?  I don't know.  But what I do know is that John McCain is not a natural born citizen of the United States.  Or is he?  If you haven't been paying attention, and I know many of you haven't, you should know that some people have this silly idea that John McCain is ineligible to serve as President.  The issue isn't whether Mac is American.  He is.  He's as American as mac and cheese.  The real question, however, is this:  is Mac a natural born American citizen? 

  That question remains to be answered.  Adding to the long list of things that John McCain is older than is this one:  John McCain is older than the existence of citizenship for those born in the Panama Canal Zone during US occupation.  Mac was born in 1936, prior to the 1937 law enacted in order to confer citizenship upon the children of American parents born in the canal zone after 1904.  The year 1904, by the way, was the year that America bought rights to the zone from the French and commenced construction on the canal.

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